A bold new Australian-first trial is underway in an attempt to provide fresh hope to children diagnosed with a fatal paediatric brain cancer.
The new research – launched for the first time outside of the United States – will be conducted by doctors at Sydney Children’s Hospital, Randwick (SCH) and will use a child’s own immune system to specifically target Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG).

The process involves CAR-T cells – a type of white blood cell – being taken out of the patient’s body in a laboratory, then genetically engineering them to target and attack the deadly cancer.

The trial, called Levi’s Catch, is dedicated to the memory of Levi Wheeler, who died at just eight-years-old. (Supplied)
Levi Wheeler passed away from a rare brain tumour at just eight years of age. (A Current Affair)

The immune cells are then infused back into the child, scanning and destroying the harmful cancer cells.

The trial, called Levi’s Catch, is dedicated to the memory of Levi Wheeler, who died at just eight-years-old.

Levi had only just celebrated his seventh birthday when his parents Kathryn and Ben received his diagnosis in 2018.

Levi’s Catch is open to children across the country and is a joint effort between the Kids Cancer Centre at SCH, Children’s Cancer Institute, Royal Adelaide Hospital and the University of South Australia, with support from the Cancer Institute NSW. (Supplied)

Their football-loving little boy’s condition was inoperable and he was given a year left to live.

With the support of family and friends, he travelled the world, made new friends, and even carried the match ball at a Real Madrid game in Paris in front of 80,000 fans.

Just a few days after Christmas, Levi slipped away, but his legacy was only the beginning.

To honour his legacy, his parents set up Levi’s Project and have since raised an astonishing $4 million, with another $2 million pledged for DIPG research – $600,000 of which will be put towards the new trial.

Levi’s Catch is open to children across the country and is a joint effort between the Kids Cancer Centre at SCH, Children’s Cancer Institute, Royal Adelaide Hospital and the University of South Australia, with support from the Cancer Institute NSW.

Óskarsdóttir has witnessed PSC before so she knew immediately what it was. "Those clouds can't be mistaken for something else," she told 9news.com.au. "They are very bright and are not moving while other clouds can be moving fast. They appear in the sky and stay there sometimes for hours and you can see the colours, sometimes pale and sometimes bright. "It's hard to explain you just accept the glory of nature and enjoy"

Rare atmospheric event dazzles nurse in the Arctic Circle

Sign up here to receive our daily newsletters and breaking news alerts, sent straight to your inbox.
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

Humpback whale freed after overnight rescue mission near Perth

Wildlife crews have successfully freed a 12-metre humpback whale found entangled in…

Illegal Alien From Turkey is More Worried About Open Border than Joe Biden

You know things are pretty bad on the southern border when one…

Floreat, Western Australia: Two people shot dead at a home in Perth – with a third person rushed to hospital

Two people have been gunned down in suburban Perth  A third is…

Aussie fashion label Dion Lee 'calls in administrators'

Celebrity favourite Australian fashion label Dion Lee has appointed voluntary administrators. The…