José Garza was backed by George Soros during his campaign

The city of Austin’s George Soros-backed DA has slammed the Texas Governor’s vow to pardon a soldier who was convicted of murdering a Black Lives Matter protester who pointed an AK-47 at him during a protest in 2020.

Travis County District Attorney General José Garza condemned Greg Abbott’s promise to contact the state Board of Pardons and Paroles to recommend the board expedite his request to pardon Sgt. Daniel Perry.  

Perry was convicted Friday by a Travis County jury in Garza’s district of fatally shooting 28-year-old Garrett Foster during a July 2020 protest in Austin over George Floyd’s murder. He faces up to life in prison when sentenced later this week.

‘In a state that believes in upholding the importance of the rule of law, the Governor’s statement that he will intervene in the legal proceedings surrounding the death of Garrett Foster is deeply troubling,’ began Garza in a statement posted to Twitter

‘In this case, a jury of twelve listened to testimony for nearly two weeks, upending their lives to painstakingly evaluate the evidence and arguments presented by both the State and the Defense,’ Garza explained.

José Garza was backed by George Soros during his campaign

José Garza was backed by George Soros during his campaign

José Garza, DA from Travis County, Texas

José Garza, DA from Travis County, Texas

José Garza was backed by George Soros during his campaign and has condemned Abbott’s promise to intervene in the legal proceedings surrounding Garrett Foster’s death 

Perry, above, was convicted of murder on Friday for fatally shooting Garrett Foster, an armed protester in 2020, during nationwide protests against police violence and racial injustice

Perry, above, was convicted of murder on Friday for fatally shooting Garrett Foster, an armed protester in 2020, during nationwide protests against police violence and racial injustice

Perry, above, was convicted of murder on Friday for fatally shooting Garrett Foster, an armed protester in 2020, during nationwide protests against police violence and racial injustice

U.S. Army Sgt. Daniel Perry, was seen walking out of the courtroom during jury deliberations in his murder trial, on Friday

U.S. Army Sgt. Daniel Perry, was seen walking out of the courtroom during jury deliberations in his murder trial, on Friday

U.S. Army Sgt. Daniel Perry, was seen walking out of the courtroom during jury deliberations in his murder trial, on Friday

‘After hearing from civilian eyewitnesses and expert witnesses, and deliberating for over fifteen hours, they reached the unanimous decision that Daniel Perry did not kill Garrett Foster in self- defense and was guilty of murder beyond a reasonable doubt,’ Garza wrote as he recounted the case.

‘In our legal system, a jury that gets to decide whether a defendant is guilty or innocent – not the Governor,’ he added.

‘Make no mistake, without intervention from the Governor, the defendant’s conviction would be reviewed by both state and federal courts who will examine the record to ensure that no legal errors were made at this level and that the evidence supported the conviction. 

‘Our constitution has built in protections to ensure that no defendant is convicted when the law or evidence does not support it, and this is a central tenant of our legal system,’ Garza, a George Soros-backed Democratic DA, added.

On Saturday, Governor Abbott tweeted he would work to quickly pardon the army sergeant and reign in Garza together with other supposed ‘rogue District Attorneys.’

Abbott said he was planning to ask the state Board of Pardons and Paroles to recommend a pardon and to expedite his request in order to pardon Sgt. Daniel Perry.

‘I look forward to approving the board’s pardon recommendation as soon as it hits my desk,’ the GOP lawmaker wrote.

Abbott’s intentions saw Whitney Mitchell, Garrett Foster’s fiancée, composed a devastating statement of her own on Sunday afternoon in which she criticized the Republican Governor. 

‘I felt some sense of justice and relief…The governor has immediately taken that away since he announced there are two legal systems in Texas: One for those with power, like Mr. Perry, and one for everyone else.’ 

Abbott's intentions saw Whitney Mitchell, left, Garrett Foster's fiancée, compose a statement of her own on Sunday afternoon in which she criticized the Republican Governor

Abbott's intentions saw Whitney Mitchell, left, Garrett Foster's fiancée, compose a statement of her own on Sunday afternoon in which she criticized the Republican Governor

Abbott’s intentions saw Whitney Mitchell, left, Garrett Foster’s fiancée, compose a statement of her own on Sunday afternoon in which she criticized the Republican Governor

'I felt some sense of justice and relief…The governor has immediately taken that away since he announced there are two legal systems in Texas: One for those with power, like Mr. Perry, and one for everyone else,' Mitchell wrote on Sunday. She is pictured crying in court last Friday

'I felt some sense of justice and relief…The governor has immediately taken that away since he announced there are two legal systems in Texas: One for those with power, like Mr. Perry, and one for everyone else,' Mitchell wrote on Sunday. She is pictured crying in court last Friday

‘I felt some sense of justice and relief…The governor has immediately taken that away since he announced there are two legal systems in Texas: One for those with power, like Mr. Perry, and one for everyone else,’ Mitchell wrote on Sunday. She is pictured crying in court last Friday 

Garrett Foster is seen at the driver's window. The barrel of the rifle is pointed towards the ground, while his right arm is high with his hand seemingly placed on the grip of the weapon. His weapon and Perry's were both legally-obtained

Garrett Foster is seen at the driver's window. The barrel of the rifle is pointed towards the ground, while his right arm is high with his hand seemingly placed on the grip of the weapon. His weapon and Perry's were both legally-obtained

Garrett Foster is seen at the driver’s window. The barrel of the rifle is pointed towards the ground, while his right arm is high with his hand seemingly placed on the grip of the weapon. His weapon and Perry’s were both legally-obtained 

Perry, a Fort Hood Army Sgt was driving his car as an Uber driver that evening to earn some extra cash, when he tried to get through a crowd of Black Lives Matter protesters.

One of those protesters – Garrett Foster – pointed his AK-47 in the window of Perry’s car, with the serviceman opening fire in response and killing Foster.

Both men’s guns were legally-obtained, with jurors in Austin claiming Perry had other, non-deadly means of self-defense available to him.  

‘Texas has one of the strongest ‘Stand Your Ground’ laws of self-defense that cannot be nullified by a jury or a progressive District Attorney,’ Abbott said.

After the Friday ruling, Garza issued praised the prosecution’s efforts.

‘I’m grateful to our dedicated career prosecutors and victims’ counselors who tried this case,’ he said. They worked hard to make a complete and accurate presentation of the facts to the jury. Our hearts continue to break for the Foster family. We hope this verdict brings closure and peace to the victim’s family.’

Garza is one of numerous district attorneys across the country whose campaigns received millions in funding from Soros, leading directly to wave of liberally-minded judicial policies and decisions.

He received about $600,000 from the Soros-backed Texas Justice and Safety PAC during his campaign, leading to his appointment in 2021.

Soros has funded the campaigns of dozens of liberal prosecutors across the US. He has defended it, saying America needs to invest less in prisons and more in other strategies that he claims will reduce crime

Soros has funded the campaigns of dozens of liberal prosecutors across the US. He has defended it, saying America needs to invest less in prisons and more in other strategies that he claims will reduce crime

Soros has funded the campaigns of dozens of liberal prosecutors across the US. He has defended it, saying America needs to invest less in prisons and more in other strategies that he claims will reduce crime 

Garza vowed to end ‘over-prosecution’ of minorities and impoverished residents.

He has also drawn ire from the Austin Police Department for arresting officers for incidents which had been handled through department’s internal process.

Other Soros-backed DAs include Alvin Bragg, who led effort to indict former president Donald Trump over hush-money payments made to pornstar Stormy Daniels.

The billionaire’s DAs have stripped away bail laws and opted to forgo prosecuting crimes like theft and reckless driving, effectively giving criminals a free pass and leading to the breakdown of law and order across the United States.

As a direct result, crime has skyrocketed in major cities overseen by Soros’s DAs. In 2021 under Kim Foxx’s reign, Chicago had the most murders it’s seen since 1994. And in Philadelphia, drug use and violent crime has seen a surge since Larry Krasner took office.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott has said he is seeking to pardon a U.S. Army sergeant who was convicted of murder in the 2020 fatal shooting of an armed protester during nationwide protests against police violence and racial injustice

Texas Governor Greg Abbott has said he is seeking to pardon a U.S. Army sergeant who was convicted of murder in the 2020 fatal shooting of an armed protester during nationwide protests against police violence and racial injustice

Texas Governor Greg Abbott has said he is seeking to pardon a U.S. Army sergeant who was convicted of murder in the 2020 fatal shooting of an armed protester during nationwide protests against police violence and racial injustice

Texas Governor Greg Abbott has instructed the Board of Pardons and Paroles to recommend a pardon and to expedite his request

Texas Governor Greg Abbott has instructed the Board of Pardons and Paroles to recommend a pardon and to expedite his request

Texas Governor Greg Abbott has instructed the Board of Pardons and Paroles to recommend a pardon and to expedite his request

U.S. Army Sgt. Daniel Perry is comforted by his attorney Doug O'Connell after he was convicted of murder in the killing of Garrett Foster

U.S. Army Sgt. Daniel Perry is comforted by his attorney Doug O'Connell after he was convicted of murder in the killing of Garrett Foster

U.S. Army Sgt. Daniel Perry is comforted by his attorney Doug O’Connell after he was convicted of murder in the killing of Garrett Foster

Perry killed Garrett Foster, 28, who is pictured with his wife Whitney Mitchell, a quadruple amputee who uses a wheelchair

Perry killed Garrett Foster, 28, who is pictured with his wife Whitney Mitchell, a quadruple amputee who uses a wheelchair

Perry killed Garrett Foster, 28, who is pictured with his wife Whitney Mitchell, a quadruple amputee who uses a wheelchair 

Daniel Perry, a 37-year-old Uber driver and Army sergeant, was found guilty of murder

Daniel Perry, a 37-year-old Uber driver and Army sergeant, was found guilty of murder

Daniel Perry, a 37-year-old Uber driver and Army sergeant, was found guilty of murder

Perry’s attorneys argued that the shooting was self-defense as Foster approached Perry’s car with an AK-47 rifle. 

Prosecutors said Perry could have driven away before firing his revolver and witnesses testified that Foster never raised his rifle at Perry.

Foster attended the protest with his wife Whitney, a quadruple-amputee who uses a wheelchair.  

The jury deliberated 17 hours over two days to reach its decision, after an eight-day trial. He sobbed when the guilty verdict was read out, and hugged his attorney. Perry faces up to life in prison. 

Perry, who was charged in 2021, was stationed at Ft. Hood about 70 miles north of Austin in July 2020 when he was working for as an Uber driver and turned onto a street straight into a large crowd of BLM demonstrators in downtown Austin.

In video streamed live on Facebook, a car can be heard honking before several shots ring out and protesters begin screaming and scattering.

Garrett Foster and and his wife, Whitney Mitchell, are seen at the July 2020 protest

Garrett Foster and and his wife, Whitney Mitchell, are seen at the July 2020 protest

Garrett Foster and and his girlfriend, Whitney Mitchell, are seen at the July 2020 protest

Garrett Foster was caught on camera earlier in the evening explaining why he felt the need for an AK-47

Garrett Foster was caught on camera earlier in the evening explaining why he felt the need for an AK-47

Garrett Foster was caught on camera earlier in the evening explaining why he felt the need for an AK-47 

First responders were seen preparing to transport Foster to a local hospital where he was later pronounced dead in a photograph from July 25, 2020

First responders were seen preparing to transport Foster to a local hospital where he was later pronounced dead in a photograph from July 25, 2020

First responders were seen preparing to transport Foster to a local hospital where he was later pronounced dead in a photograph from July 25, 2020

Witnesses said during the trial that Foster never raised his rifle at Perry – but a photograph taken at the time appears to suggest otherwise. 

On Friday, a jury found Perry guilty of murder, but not guilty of aggravated assault. 

Perry’s defense attorneys, in their closing arguments, insisted that he had no choice but to shoot Foster five times as he approached Perry’s car with an AK-47 rifle.

Prosecutors said Perry had plenty of choices, including driving away before he fired his revolver.

Although Texas is known as a conservative, staunchly-pro Second Amendment state, its three big cities – Austin, Dallas and Houston – are all very liberal. 

Austin in particular is known for its progressive politics, and played host to large Black Lives Matter protests and riots during summer 2020. 

During the trial, Garza and his team of prosecutors presented social media posts where Perry was critical of the ‘anti-police’ sentiments being stoked across the nation after the murder of George Floyd 

Guillermo Gonzalez, prosecuting, said Perry’s postings showed he was vehemently opposed to protesters.

Perry also said that in Texas you could get away with shooting them.

‘This is an age-old story about a man who couldn’t keep his anger under control,’ said Gonzalez. ‘It’s not about police, and it’s not about protest marchers.’ 

Cell phone footage captured the moment the fatal shots rang out

Cell phone footage captured the moment the fatal shots rang out

The vehicle is seen above

The vehicle is seen above

Foster had been crossing 4th Street on Congress Avenue with Mitchell and hundreds of other demonstrators when a motorist sped towards the crowd and began blaring its horn. Cell phone footage captured the moment the fatal shots rang out

The scene of Foster's shooting in Austin, Texas on July 25, 2020

The scene of Foster's shooting in Austin, Texas on July 25, 2020

The scene of Foster’s shooting in Austin, Texas on July 25, 2020

Gonzalez said Perry drove angrily into the crowd even though he could clearly see the protesters marching from three different angles.

The state argued Perry sped into the crowd, but that was disputed by the defense’s expert witnesses who used science and data to track the speed of his car. The expert testified he was slowing down when his car entered the demonstration. 

Doug O’Connell, defending Perry, said prosecutors wanted the jury ‘to believe (Perry) had this evil plan when he turned right.’

‘The protesters didn’t know anything about Perry when they attacked the car and boxed it in,’ he said.

‘And Daniel had no choice, and that could have happened to anyone.’

Activists are pictured on July 26, 2020 holding a vigil for Foster, the day after he was killed

Activists are pictured on July 26, 2020 holding a vigil for Foster, the day after he was killed

Activists are pictured on July 26, 2020 holding a vigil for Foster, the day after he was killed 

O’Connell argued that Foster was dressed for battle at the protest, including wearing a neoprene vest under his T-shirt and carrying an AK-47, a club and a knife. 

Perry was wearing a T-shirt, shorts and flip-flops. ‘Garrett Foster is dressed for war,’ O’Connell said. ‘Daniel Perry is dressed for the beach.’

When Foster was killed, demonstrators in Austin and beyond had been marching in the streets for weeks following the police killing of George Floyd.

Floyd died May 25, 2020, after a Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee against the black man’s neck for more than nine minutes. Floyd, who was handcuffed, repeatedly said he couldn’t breathe.

Floyd’s killing was recorded on video by a bystander and sparked worldwide protests as part of a broader reckoning over racial injustice.

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