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Saturday, July 2, 2022

The Tragic Story Of Warren Jeffs’ Son Roy

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As People magazine reported, Roy Jeffs died by suicide in Salt Lake City, Utah, on May 29, 2019, less than one week before his 27th birthday. Roy’s death was announced by his sister Rachel, who blamed their father, Warren, for the ensuing event. Rachel said Warren was specifically harsh with Roy and, in her opinion, “didn’t love him.” For Roy, being isolated from his family was especially devastating, and Rachel said Warren made it even worse by blaming Roy and trying to turn everyone against him, per People.

According to Roy’s obituary, he “was a proud member of the LGBT community.” He was known as a compassionate, empathetic, and loving man, who was determined to become “his own person,” as opposed to being remembered as part of the Jeffs family and the FLDS. There were some bright spots in his life, as his obituary noted. He enjoyed watching Disney movies, the TV sitcom “Friends,” and listening to music by Taylor Swift. He loved trying new foods and making new friends. He also worked tirelessly to find his mother, who he had not seen or spoken to in several years.

If you or anyone you know has been a victim of sexual assault, help is available. Visit the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network website or contact RAINN’s National Helpline at 1-800-656-HOPE (4673).

If you or someone you know is dealing with spiritual abuse, you can call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1−800−799−7233. You can also find more information, resources, and support at their website.

If you or anyone you know is having suicidal thoughts, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline​ at​ 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

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